Minggu, 10 Juli 2016

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The Pride Parade route Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. The Houston Pride Festival and Pride Parade are at the center of the Celebration with an attendance of over 700,000 people every year from all over the world. less The Pride Parade route Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. The Houston Pride Festival and Pride Parade are at the center of the Celebration with an attendance of over 700,000 people every year from all over ... more Photo: Houston Chronicle
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Mr. Cirque walks the parade route on top a ball Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. The Houston Pride Festival and Pride Parade are at the center of the Celebration with an attendance of over 700,000 people every year from all over the world. less Mr. Cirque walks the parade route on top a ball Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. The Houston Pride Festival and Pride Parade are at the center of the Celebration with an attendance of over 700,000 people ... more Photo: Houston Chronicle
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Mr. Cirque walks the parade route on top a ball Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. The Houston Pride Festival and Pride Parade are at the center of the Celebration with an attendance of over 700,000 people every year from all over the world. less Mr. Cirque walks the parade route on top a ball Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. The Houston Pride Festival and Pride Parade are at the center of the Celebration with an attendance of over 700,000 people ... more Photo: Houston Chronicle
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The Pride Parade parade route Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. The Houston Pride Festival and Pride Parade are at the center of the Celebration with an attendance of over 700,000 people every year from all over the world. less The Pride Parade parade route Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. The Houston Pride Festival and Pride Parade are at the center of the Celebration with an attendance of over 700,000 people every year from all ... more Photo: Houston Chronicle
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The Pride Parade route Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. The Houston Pride Festival and Pride Parade are at the center of the Celebration with an attendance of over 700,000 people every year from all over the world. less The Pride Parade route Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. The Houston Pride Festival and Pride Parade are at the center of the Celebration with an attendance of over 700,000 people every year from all over ... more Photo: Houston Chronicle
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The Pride Parade route Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. The Houston Pride Festival and Pride Parade are at the center of the Celebration with an attendance of over 700,000 people every year from all over the world. less The Pride Parade route Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. The Houston Pride Festival and Pride Parade are at the center of the Celebration with an attendance of over 700,000 people every year from all over ... more Photo: Houston Chronicle
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The Pride Parade route Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. The Houston Pride Festival and Pride Parade are at the center of the Celebration with an attendance of over 700,000 people every year from all over the world. less The Pride Parade route Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. The Houston Pride Festival and Pride Parade are at the center of the Celebration with an attendance of over 700,000 people every year from all over ... more Photo: Houston Chronicle
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The Pride Parade parade route Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. The Houston Pride Festival and Pride Parade are at the center of the Celebration with an attendance of over 700,000 people every year from all over the world. less The Pride Parade parade route Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. The Houston Pride Festival and Pride Parade are at the center of the Celebration with an attendance of over 700,000 people every year from all ... more Photo: Houston Chronicle
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The Pride Parade parade route Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. The Houston Pride Festival and Pride Parade are at the center of the Celebration with an attendance of over 700,000 people every year from all over the world. less The Pride Parade parade route Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. The Houston Pride Festival and Pride Parade are at the center of the Celebration with an attendance of over 700,000 people every year from all ... more Photo: Houston Chronicle
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The Pride Parade parade route Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. The Houston Pride Festival and Pride Parade are at the center of the Celebration with an attendance of over 700,000 people every year from all over the world. less The Pride Parade parade route Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. The Houston Pride Festival and Pride Parade are at the center of the Celebration with an attendance of over 700,000 people every year from all ... more Photo: Houston Chronicle
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The Pride Parade parade route Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. The Houston Pride Festival and Pride Parade are at the center of the Celebration with an attendance of over 700,000 people every year from all over the world. less The Pride Parade parade route Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. The Houston Pride Festival and Pride Parade are at the center of the Celebration with an attendance of over 700,000 people every year from all ... more Photo: Houston Chronicle
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The Pride Parade parade route Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. The Houston Pride Festival and Pride Parade are at the center of the Celebration with an attendance of over 700,000 people every year from all over the world. less The Pride Parade parade route Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. The Houston Pride Festival and Pride Parade are at the center of the Celebration with an attendance of over 700,000 people every year from all ... more Photo: Houston Chronicle
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The Pride Parade parade route Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. The Houston Pride Festival and Pride Parade are at the center of the Celebration with an attendance of over 700,000 people every year from all over the world. less The Pride Parade parade route Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. The Houston Pride Festival and Pride Parade are at the center of the Celebration with an attendance of over 700,000 people every year from all ... more Photo: Houston Chronicle
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The Houston Pride Festival and Pride Parade are at the center of the Celebration with an attendance of over 700,000 people every year from all over the world. Come and join all of the LGBT Community in celebrating who we are as a people. Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. less The Houston Pride Festival and Pride Parade are at the center of the Celebration with an attendance of over 700,000 people every year from all over the world. Come and join all of the LGBT Community in ... more Photo: Steve Gonzales, Houston Chronicle
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The Houston Pride Festival Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
The Houston Pride Festival Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
Photo: Steve Gonzales, Houston Chronicle
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During the 2002 parade Juan Gonzales helps carry an American flag in the Cesar Chavez Hispanic Pride Day Parade, which was held in April.
During the 2002 parade Juan Gonzales helps carry an American flag in the Cesar Chavez Hispanic Pride Day Parade, which was held in April.
Photo: Buster Dean, Houston Chronicle
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The Pride Parade route Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. The Houston Pride Festival and Pride Parade are at the center of the Celebration with an attendance of over 700,000 people every year from all over the world. less The Pride Parade route Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. The Houston Pride Festival and Pride Parade are at the center of the Celebration with an attendance of over 700,000 people every year from all over ... more Photo: Steve Gonzales, Houston Chronicle
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The Pride Parade route Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. The Houston Pride Festival and Pride Parade are at the center of the Celebration with an attendance of over 700,000 people every year from all over the world. less The Pride Parade route Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. The Houston Pride Festival and Pride Parade are at the center of the Celebration with an attendance of over 700,000 people every year from all over ... more Photo: Steve Gonzales, Houston Chronicle
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The Pride Parade route Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. The Houston Pride Festival and Pride Parade are at the center of the Celebration with an attendance of over 700,000 people every year from all over the world. less The Pride Parade route Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. The Houston Pride Festival and Pride Parade are at the center of the Celebration with an attendance of over 700,000 people every year from all over ... more Photo: Steve Gonzales, Houston Chronicle
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The Pride Parade route Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. The Houston Pride Festival and Pride Parade are at the center of the Celebration with an attendance of over 700,000 people every year from all over the world. less The Pride Parade route Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. The Houston Pride Festival and Pride Parade are at the center of the Celebration with an attendance of over 700,000 people every year from all over ... more Photo: Steve Gonzales, Houston Chronicle
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The Pride Parade route Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. The Houston Pride Festival and Pride Parade are at the center of the Celebration with an attendance of over 700,000 people every year from all over the world. less The Pride Parade route Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. The Houston Pride Festival and Pride Parade are at the center of the Celebration with an attendance of over 700,000 people every year from all over ... more Photo: Steve Gonzales, Houston Chronicle
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The Pride Parade parade route Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. The Houston Pride Festival and Pride Parade are at the center of the Celebration with an attendance of over 700,000 people every year from all over the world. less The Pride Parade parade route Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. The Houston Pride Festival and Pride Parade are at the center of the Celebration with an attendance of over 700,000 people every year from all ... more Photo: Steve Gonzales, Houston Chronicle
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Mayor Turner on the Pride Parade route Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. The Houston Pride Festival and Pride Parade are at the center of the Celebration with an attendance of over 700,000 people every year from all over the world. less Mayor Turner on the Pride Parade route Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. The Houston Pride Festival and Pride Parade are at the center of the Celebration with an attendance of over 700,000 people every year ... more Photo: Steve Gonzales, Houston Chronicle
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The Pride Parade parade route Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. The Houston Pride Festival and Pride Parade are at the center of the Celebration with an attendance of over 700,000 people every year from all over the world. less The Pride Parade parade route Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. The Houston Pride Festival and Pride Parade are at the center of the Celebration with an attendance of over 700,000 people every year from all ... more Photo: Steve Gonzales, Houston Chronicle
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The Pride Parade parade route Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. The Houston Pride Festival and Pride Parade are at the center of the Celebration with an attendance of over 700,000 people every year from all over the world. less The Pride Parade parade route Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. The Houston Pride Festival and Pride Parade are at the center of the Celebration with an attendance of over 700,000 people every year from all ... more Photo: Steve Gonzales, Houston Chronicle
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The Houston Pride Festival Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
The Houston Pride Festival Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
Photo: Steve Gonzales, Houston Chronicle
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Thousands of people gather in Hermann Square to celebrate the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
Thousands of people gather in Hermann Square to celebrate the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
Photo: Jon Shapley, Houston Chronicle
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Erik Ikerd is one of thousands of people celebrating at Hermann Square for the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
Erik Ikerd is one of thousands of people celebrating at Hermann Square for the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
Photo: Jon Shapley, Houston Chronicle
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Rocio Castillo, right, and her friend "Carol," talk in Hermann Square as they celebrate the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. "It's very special because Orlando touched my heart," Castillo said. less Rocio Castillo, right, and her friend "Carol," talk in Hermann Square as they celebrate the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. "It's very special because Orlando touched my ... more Photo: Jon Shapley, Houston Chronicle
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Lauren Goulet, right, and John Dye, both from Houston, carry rainbow flags during the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. "It's standing up to the fear that people are trying to instill in us," Goulet said. less Lauren Goulet, right, and John Dye, both from Houston, carry rainbow flags during the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. "It's standing up to the fear that people are trying to ... more Photo: Jon Shapley, Houston Chronicle
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Susana Padilla wears rainbow facepaint at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. "I feel like more people should be coming to support," she said. "Don't let fear win."
Susana Padilla wears rainbow facepaint at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. "I feel like more people should be coming to support," she said. "Don't let fear win."
Photo: Jon Shapley, Houston Chronicle
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Lauren Goulet, left, and John Dye, both from Houston, carry rainbow flags during the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. "It's standing up to the fear that people are trying to instill in us," Goulet said. less Lauren Goulet, left, and John Dye, both from Houston, carry rainbow flags during the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. "It's standing up to the fear that people are trying to ... more Photo: Jon Shapley, Houston Chronicle
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Lauren Goulet, right, and John Dye, both from Houston, carry rainbow flags during the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. "It's standing up to the fear that people are trying to instill in us," Goulet said. less Lauren Goulet, right, and John Dye, both from Houston, carry rainbow flags during the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. "It's standing up to the fear that people are trying to ... more Photo: Jon Shapley, Houston Chronicle
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Rocio Castillo, right, and her friend "Carol," stand under a rainbow flag in Hermann Square as they celebrate the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. "It's very special because Orlando touched my heart," Castillo said. less Rocio Castillo, right, and her friend "Carol," stand under a rainbow flag in Hermann Square as they celebrate the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston. "It's very special because ... more Photo: Jon Shapley, Houston Chronicle
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People pose for a photo at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
People pose for a photo at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
Photo: Jon Shapley, Houston Chronicle
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People pose for a photo at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
People pose for a photo at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
Photo: Jon Shapley, Houston Chronicle
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People pose for a photo at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
People pose for a photo at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
Photo: Jon Shapley, Houston Chronicle
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People pose for a photo at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
People pose for a photo at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
Photo: Jon Shapley, Houston Chronicle
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People pose for a photo at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
People pose for a photo at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
Photo: Jon Shapley, Houston Chronicle
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People pose for a photo at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
People pose for a photo at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
Photo: Jon Shapley, Houston Chronicle
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People pose for a photo at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
People pose for a photo at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
Photo: Jon Shapley, Houston Chronicle
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People pose for a photo at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
People pose for a photo at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
Photo: Jon Shapley, Houston Chronicle
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People pose for a photo at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
People pose for a photo at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
Photo: Jon Shapley, Houston Chronicle
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People pose for a photo at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
People pose for a photo at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
Photo: Jon Shapley, Houston Chronicle
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People pose for a photo at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
People pose for a photo at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
Photo: Jon Shapley, Houston Chronicle
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People pose for a photo at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
People pose for a photo at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
Photo: Jon Shapley, Houston Chronicle
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People pose for a photo at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
People pose for a photo at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
Photo: Jon Shapley, Houston Chronicle
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Chibbi Orduna kisses his boyfriend Cory Blanchard as they sit by the reflection pool in front of City Hall, at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
Chibbi Orduna kisses his boyfriend Cory Blanchard as they sit by the reflection pool in front of City Hall, at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
Photo: Jon Shapley, Houston Chronicle
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People pose for a photo at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
People pose for a photo at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
Photo: Jon Shapley, Houston Chronicle
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People pose for a photo at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
People pose for a photo at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
Photo: Jon Shapley, Houston Chronicle
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People pose for a photo at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
People pose for a photo at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
Photo: Jon Shapley, Houston Chronicle
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People pose for a photo at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
People pose for a photo at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
Photo: Jon Shapley, Houston Chronicle
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People pose for a photo at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
People pose for a photo at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
Photo: Jon Shapley, Houston Chronicle
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People pose for a photo at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
People pose for a photo at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
Photo: Jon Shapley, Houston Chronicle
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A woman runs through the rain as a short storm rolls through the area during the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
A woman runs through the rain as a short storm rolls through the area during the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
Photo: Jon Shapley, Houston Chronicle
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Juan Guerrero, left, and Onasys Gil sit by the reflection pool at City Hall, at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
Juan Guerrero, left, and Onasys Gil sit by the reflection pool at City Hall, at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
Photo: Jon Shapley, Houston Chronicle
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People pose for a photo at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
People pose for a photo at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
Photo: Jon Shapley, Houston Chronicle
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People pose for a photo at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
People pose for a photo at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
Photo: Jon Shapley, Houston Chronicle
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People pose for a photo at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
People pose for a photo at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
Photo: Jon Shapley, Houston Chronicle
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People pose for a photo at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
People pose for a photo at the 2016 Houston Pride Festival, Saturday, June 25, 2016, in Houston.
Photo: Jon Shapley, Houston Chronicle
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Crowds turn out at Houston Pride Festival to celebrate, make a statement after Orlando
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For some, the Houston Pride Festival was a day to celebrate a wedding anniversary one year after the Supreme Court legalized gay marriage.
Others who turned out wanted to make a statement of defiance two weeks after a gunman opened fire at a gay nightclub in Orlando, killing 49 people.
Whatever the reason for attending, Saturday was an emotional day for many of the estimated 700,000 people who went to Houston's 38th annual Pride festival and parade. Police reported no incidents and said the crowd appeared larger than in years past.
John LaRue, 31, and Hunter Middleton 26 — who a year ago were the first in line at the Harris County Courthouse to get a marriage license atter the high court's ruling — were among those marching in the parade.
LaRue said some friends who marched with them had been on the fence before. The June parade is typically hot and crowded and "a giant traffic mess," LaRue said.
"Once Orlando happened," he added, "it was like there's not really a question. We're all going to march this year."
City Hall was lit up brightly in rainbow hues as the parade officially rolled through downtown Saturday night.
Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner, wearing a crisp white shirt and a neck full of colorful beads, rolled by in an open-air convertible. He waved and tossed beads left and right.
Fans grabbed at hundreds of glow sticks thrown their way out of the back of a police car; they were shined in remembrance of the victims of the mass shooting at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando on June 12. About 30 people carried a massive rainbow flag listing the names of all 49 victims of the deadly shooting rampage.
The honorary grand marshal of the parade was Imran Yousuf, the ex-Marine who as a bouncer at the Pulse nightclub helped to save the lives of people during the chaos.
Saturday night, he rode in a green SUV adorned with colorful flowers, standing up through the sunroof to wave at and salute the crowd.
"It feels enlightening now," Yousuf said before the parade. "I feel people are moving past the incident and coming out here. You can see people are trying to find ways to rebuild and just taking a dark situation and making light of it."
"It's such a good feeling — not to stay wallowing, but to get out there and help rebuild and remember the ones we lost in the best way we can."
Orlando was indeed on the minds of many, contributing to feelings of unease and solemnity but also to a sense of solidarity and mission. 
Gerald Curlee, 49, and Jerry Chaffin, 71, were in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., during the weekend of the shooting. "We had family members calling us constantly saying 'Oh my God, are you OK?" Curlee said.
Curlee and Chaffin, who have been together 18 years, wore matching khaki shorts and shirts to the Pride festival. On the shirts, it said "Happy" with a rainbow emblematic of the changes in the LGBT community.
"The tragedy in Orlando brought the world together to view the gay community as normal," Chaffin said.
He teared up recalling those he's lost in his life to violence against gays. He remembered feeling fear when he served in the Navy in the 1960s and during the '70s in Houston, a time he said when violence against gays was commonplace and the police looked the other way.
"We're happy in what we chose in life. It's very important that everyone understands that," Curlee said.
Monica Robledo, 45, who works at Walmart in Deer Park, came adorned in rainbow while her daughter Destiny, 18, wore a rainbow tutu. Monica, at her first Pride festival, had painted a message of "No Hate'' on her face.
"I wanted to spend it with my daughter. I'm here to support her because she's my daughter, she's my baby," Monica said. "I love her no matter what, whether she's gay or straight." 
Mindful of the Orlando shooting, she said: "We shouldn't be scared. We got to be strong for our country and show people they can't defeat us."
The Green family, including four young children, came out for the festivities. Tresce Green, 37, a restaurant server, and her wife Aubrey Green, 43, a chef, made their own shirts that read "Straight Out of the Closet" a play on the movie "Straight out of Compton." Their kids, ages 9, 8, 5, and 2, also made their own shirts.
The Greens wanted their children to witness the tribute during the parade to the Orlando victims.
"We want them to be involved. We want them to know that hatred is out there but we raised them to be accepting of different cultures, different religions, and just different period," Tresce Green said.
MORE PRIDE: Houston Pride events you don't want to miss
Matthew Musler, 23, of Austin, was inspired by the Orlando massacre to come to the festival and parade in Houston.
"I didn't want them to win. I don't want to be a victim," said Musler, who identifies as transgender. A Costco worker, Musler began the transition from female to male in April 2015.
He also hopes the transgender community can become more visible after the tragedy.
"LGBT people are seen but transgender people are invisible now," he said. "I think they need to notice all of the letters."
Just beyond the concert stage near the tranquility pond downtown, Jennifer Nichols waited at a booth for her new custom-pressed t-shirt to dry. Nichols, 31, chose the same design as her friend Andi, a rainbow-colored outline of the state of Texas with a heart marking Houston. This was her first time attending the city's Pride festival, Nichols said.
A LOOK BACK: Pride festivals through the years
In previous years she'd been too nervous to attend. She wasn't always "out" to her family, she said, so it made her anxious to be a part of the crowd. This year, however, the events in Orlando also changed her mind.
"It's nice to be with my people," said Nichols, a teacher from Pearland.
More than 100 local businesses, organizations, and community members participate in the parade, which started at 8:30 p.m.
During a press conference Friday, Mayor Sylvester Turner urged Houstonians to come out and support the parade despite the recent violence in Orlando.
"I understand there's a concern," Turner said. "The message is simple: Let's not be afraid."
Turner and Police Chief Martha Montalvo said FRiday there would be a heavy police presence at the festival and along the parade route. According to Pride Houston's website, no firearms are allowed on the premises. There also will be random vehicle searches throughout the day.
Montalvo confirmed Friday that police investigated the circumstances around a tweet threatening a shooting during the Houston Pride parade. Police determined that a teen tweeted the message to discourage her brother from attending, but that it posted no danger.
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No comments | 07.18
Storm clean up in Kenora, Whiteshell
Kenora city road crews are working on repairs today. School Road is closed, along with a section of Veterans Drive between Villeneuve Road and Rabbit Lake Road. Traffic has been rerouted around the…
Storm causes road closure in Kenora
A section of Veterans Drive in Kenora has been closed. Flooding has closed the section between the Villeneuve Road and Rabbit Lake Road. The city is working to reduce flooding in the area, but they…
Anderson leads Eagles Class of '16 into the future
The grads from Dryden High School are off on new adventures. During yesterday's ceremony, Bruce Anderson offered a few words on behalf of the Class of '16. "My parents regularly tell me, 'Eat your…
Favreau looks forward to exciting adventure
School may only just be out for the summer. But Grade 8 valedictorian Kristen Favreau is already looking ahead to next year. During her address yesterday at St. Thomas Aquinas in Kenora, Favreau…
Intermediate Broncos awarded for their efforts
It was the last day of school yesterday, and Beaver Brae was recognizing their Grade 7 and 8 students with awards and honours. Principal Tracey Benoit talks about how proud the school is. Four Grade…
Three Kenora men face drug charges
Three Kenora men are facing drug charges. A joint investigation between the OPP and Treaty 3 police service has resulted in a series of charges. On Tuesday, shortly after 3 p.m., police conducted a…
New graduates come together for Safe Grad fun
After the caps had been thrown and diplomas handed out, graduates from St. Thomas Aquinas and Beaver Brae headed over to the Kenora Recreation Centre for Safe Grad. Beaver Brae graduate Eric Melillo…
Province investing in northern highways
The province is investing in highway infrastructure in the Northwest. Through the Northern Highways Program, the province has awarded contracts totalling $26 million for projects including 20.4…
Showers expected for the weekend
Soak up the sun while you can, there are showers in the weekend forecast. Environment Canada Meteorologist Geoff Coulson says there is even the possibility for a thunderstorm. "Unfortunately as we…
Broncos celebrate class of '16
Lucas Nystrom tugged at the heart strings of many, as he cross the stage last night at the Whitecap Pavilion in Kenora. Along with his academic achievements, he also earned the perseverance "It meant…
A grand send off for Saints graduates
Seventy-nine St. Thomas Aquinas students walked into the school last night, and 79 graduates walked out. Family and friends packed the gym to celebrate graduates as they move forward onto the next…
A dozen grads celebrate at Bimose, Kiizhik
Bimose Community High School and the Kiizhik Education Centre got in on all the graduation fun yesterday. In all, eight Bimose secondary students and four senior kindergarten students were…
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No comments | 07.17
Indonesian Foreign Minister Retno Marsudi confirmed that 13 crewmembers of the tugboat Charles 001 and the barge Robby 152 were kidnapped in two ambushes conducted by an armed group in the Sulu Sea. Six of them have been released. 
The kidnapping, believed to be conducted by the Islam extremist group Abu Sayyaf, was the third abduction of Indonesians in the last three months. 
After the incident, the Indonesian Ministry of Transport issued a notice prohibiting authorities of all habours from issuing permits to Indonesian-flagged vessels bound for the Philippines. 
Sea Transport Director General at the ministry A. Tonny Budiono stressed that the kidnapping issue has become very serious and cannot be tolerated anymore. He said Indonesia will increase patrols in its waters bordering the southern Philippines. 
The Sulu and Celebes Seas form a key maritime route between Indonesia, the Philippines and Malaysia. Each year, 55 million tonnes of goods and over 18 million people are delivered through the areas.
Last month, the three countries agreed to conduct joint sea patrols after a series of abductions.
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No comments | 07.17
One of the most important components of car insurance is the part that insures your health. There are essentially three types of coverage that accomplish that: bodily injury liability, personal injury protection, and medical payments. Oft forgotten is the latter, especially when it comes to drivers who have personal injury protection insurance. There are a few things you should know however before dismissing MedPay insurance.
What Is MedPay?
Medical Payments coverage is a "first party benefits" component of auto insurance that pays for your medical costs regardless of who was at-fault in an accident. First party means that rather than filing through another driver's insurance, MedPay will cover your expenses directly.
What is Personal Injury Protection
PIP does everything MedPay does with the addition of covering lost wages and rehabilitative costs. Overall, PIP is a more broad coverage. In most states, like Missouri, for example, PIP is optional. In states like Minnesota however, "No-Fault" states, PIP is mandatory.
Why Do I Want Either of These Coverages?
Getting into a car accident does damage to more than just your car. If you are injured in an accident, medical bills are going to rack up fast. To recoup losses due to injury from a crash, you would need to file a claim through the other driver's bodily injury liability insurance. Filing a claim through another insurance takes time, and has a degree of uncertainty to it. The other company will fight to prove you were partially responsible for the accident, chipping into how much they owe you. You do not want to be caught in a legal battle while recovering from injuries. Both PIP and MedPay eliminate the need to ever file through another insurance because they are meant to insure your own being. You file a claim with your own company, and usually see the money fast.
What is the Point of MedPay if I Can Have PIP?
While it may seem the two coverages are redundant, there are still valid reasons for also getting MedPay insurance. For one, MedPay is generally low cost. Adding on $10,000 worth of MedPay insurance may cost less than $100 a year. The exact price will depend on your company and location. It may not always be cheaper than PIP however. The two coverages can adjust in price in different areas.
Furthermore, even if PIP is the cheaper coverage, there are limits to how much you may be able to buy. Only one state, Michigan, offers unlimited PIP coverage. Considering the average hospital stay for people ages 18 to 64 is $10,000 and the average price for a non-fatal car injury $67,000, your limits for PIP should be able to match those demands. Frankly though, not every state will offer enough PIP to meet them. If you are forced to have low limits, less than $20,000, then MedPay would be the best place to turn.
What About MedPay in "No-Fault States"
Currently there are twelve "No-Fault" states that make PIP a mandatory insurance. Of that twelve, only four offer MedPay Insurance. The following "No-Fault" states are the only ones that offer MedPay.

  • Kansas
  • Florida
  • Massachusetts
  • New York

  • If you are from Hawaii, Kentucky, Minnesota, Michgian, New Jersey, North Dakota or Utah, you will not have the option to purchase MedPay insurance.
    You Should Get MedPay in FL, KS, and MA
    The simplest reason for getting MedPay insurance in these states is that the mandatory PIP does not provide enough coverage. In Kansas the most PIP coverage you can receive is $25,000, $12,000 in Florida and $8,000 in Massachusetts. In Kansas the additional cost for $10,000 worth of coverage is quite small for an entire year, about an extra $1.66 to $4.00 a month depending on which company you go with. In Massachusetts, GEICO offers up to $100,000 worth of coverage for only $33 extra per year. The low cost of MedPay can prove advantageous as medical expenses rise, as well as the cost of health insurance premiums.
    The article Why You Should Get Medical Payments Insurance originally appeared on ValuePenguin.
    The views and opinions expressed herein are the views and opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Nasdaq, Inc.
    Posted by JDWEB Seo
    No comments | 07.16
    Mariam Veiszadeh is regularly sent abusive messages on social media.
    Mariam Veiszadeh is regularly sent abusive messages on social media. Photo: Supplied
    Each time Mariam Veiszadeh​ gets a death threat, she does a cost-benefit analysis.
    The online abuse is so frequent that the lawyer and anti-Islamophobia advocate wouldn't get any work done if she reported it all to police.
    "I think about the consequences of reporting, the time and effort that goes into it, the psychological impact it has on me to pursue these matters, the potential outcome and whether it's all worth it," she said.
    Trina Pania Hohaia was fined $1000 for using a carriage service to offend.
    Trina Pania Hohaia was fined $1000 for using a carriage service to offend. Photo: Facebook
    But just before midnight one night last July, a message landed in her Facebook inbox that she didn't ignore.
    "Watch as we come for you in your sleep cut your throat as you do the animals you torment," it said. "Kill your family for you to see. Kill your uncle which is now your husband slash grand f---er.. I will find you and hunt you down."
    In one of very few cases of online abuse that are prosecuted, Trina Pania Hohaia, a 38-year-old mother from Guildford, was convicted in her absence in Hornsby Local Court in September. The Reclaim Australia supporter, whose name and image were visible on her profile, was fined $1000.
    An abusive post sent to Mariam Veiszadeh by Trina Pania Hohaia.
    An abusive post sent to Mariam Veiszadeh by Trina Pania Hohaia. Photo: Supplied
    Online abuse has become pervasive yet the number of criminal convictions cover a mere fraction of the hateful material flung around the world wide web.
    Figures provided to Fairfax Media show charges for using a carriage service to menace, harass or offend – the antiquated piece of legislation that online abuse falls under – have doubled in five years.
    Last year, there were 1111 convictions from 1585 charges in NSW although the figures are not broken down by web or telephone threats. The most common punishment was a fine of about $700, far from the maximum prison term of three years.
    Zane Alchin pleaded guilty to sending rape and death threats to Paloma Brierley Newton and others.
    Zane Alchin pleaded guilty to sending rape and death threats to Paloma Brierley Newton and others. Photo: Nick Moir
    This week, two high-profile cases ended in guilty pleas. Central Coast chiropractor and former Liberal Party member Chris Nelson, 64, admitted to posting racist abuse on the Facebook page of Indigenous politician Nova Peris, and 25-year-old labourer Zane Alchin admitted to a torrent of rape and death threats sent to a group of Sydney women.
    However, three in five Australian adults say they have been the target of online abuse and harassment, a 2015 RMIT study found.
    "When I started research in this area, you had to go out of your way to find online abuse. Now it's so bad, you have to go out of your way to avoid it," Emma A. Jane, a UNSW academic conducting a three-year study into online misogyny, said.
    Lucy Le Masurier, Paloma Brierley Newton, and Ollie Henderson set up Sexual Violence Won't Be Silenced after Zane Alchin ...
    Lucy Le Masurier, Paloma Brierley Newton, and Ollie Henderson set up Sexual Violence Won't Be Silenced after Zane Alchin sent them abusive messages. Photo: Janie Barrett
    "It's become a lingua franca online. If you don't agree with a woman, you send a rape threat or tell her she's too ugly to rape. It's so common it's become almost banal."
    The internet, particularly social media, has brought empowerment and opportunity but it has quickly become a double-edged sword.
    Eight-five per cent of women told the United Nations Broadband Commission for Digital Development last year that the internet provides them with more freedom, yet 73 per cent said they had been abused online.
    Zane Alchin leaving the Downing Centre Local Court this week.
    Zane Alchin leaving the Downing Centre Local Court this week. Photo: Nick Moir
    Anti-semitic and anti-Muslim abuse take up the lions share of reports made to the Online Hate Prevention Institute's Fight Against Hate. Misogynistic and homophobic abuse follow closely behind.
    OHPI chief executive Andre Oboler​ said social media had amplified and emboldened pre-existing bigotry.
    "People who feel isolated, who may have racist views but keep it to themselves because the people around them don't support it, will easily find people who agree with them online so suddenly their inhibition drops," he said.
    While the internet's veil of anonymity allowed a culture of abuse to develop, both Alchin and Nelson posted abuse under their own profiles. It has "become normalised to the extent ... people seem quite happy to do it under their own names now," Dr Jane said.
    This is fuelled by the perception there will be no real-world consequences, she said.
    Only 10 per cent to 20 per cent of offensive content reported to Facebook and Twitter is removed, OHPI found, and the impacts can be detrimental.
    A father who used Facebook to post messages of support for refugees told Fairfax Media that hateful responses from far right groups over the past 18 months escalated to phone calls to his wife. Fake profiles and offensive memes with his image have been spread online. He fears it will affect his future job prospects and his family's safety.
    The 47-year-old, who asked for his name to be withheld, said he was laughed out the door when he reported it to Hobart police. "But in the same breath they said they get a lot of Facebook-related suicides," he said.
    Of the 50 women Dr Jane has interviewed, none had a satisfactory response when they reported online abuse to local police. Some were told to take a break from Facebook or to change their profile picture to "something less attractive".
    Paloma Brierley Newton, the subject of Alchin's abuse, was initially turned away by Newtown police. She had stepped in to defend a friend whose profile from the dating app Tinder was being shamed on Facebook for being too provocative.
    It was only when she set up an advocacy group with her friends, Sexual Violence Won't Be Silenced, and went to the media that police became interested.
    She hopes to introduce training to all local police stations, where cases of online abuse are investigated.
    Assistant Commissioner Gary Worboys, corporate spokesman for victims of crime, said victims of online threats "can and should expect the complaint to be taken seriously".
    "While there is no ... legislation in Australia that is specifically for cyber bullying, there are existing laws police use," he said.
    While prosecutions are important, Dr Jane said we needed to address the reasons why people posted abuse.
    "We're still a long way from cultivating a culture of accountability online," she said. "There have been massive institutional failures at the level of corporations, social media platforms, police and policy makers."

    Minggu, 26 Juni 2016

    Posted by JDWEB Seo
    No comments | 19.05

  • Blogger Sophia Cachia posted a photo of herself in a strapless dress
  • The blogger, known as The Young Mummy, has size F-cup boobs
  • Followers asked her what bra she wears for strapless dresses
  • In a Snapchat video and pictures she revealed her bra secrets 

  • View comments
    As all women would know, finding a comfortable strapless bra is hard enough. 
    But if your breasts are any bigger than D cup, it's virtually impossible.

    However, one Melbourne-based blogger may have found the solution to the strapless bra woes of women everywhere, after posting pictures of the bra brand she uses to keep her F-cup breasts in place.Sophia Cachia, who blogs under the name The Young Mummy, posted photos and a video to Snapchat last week after fielding questions from fans about her lingerie of choice on Instagram.
    Scroll down for video  Magic! Blogger Sophie Cachia was asked by fans what bra she wears to keep her F-cup boobs lifted in strapless dresses after posting a photo to Instagram (above)
    'Brand for big boobies': The mother  posted a casino online photo to Snapchat showing what bra she was wearing (above)After the 25-year-old posted a photo to social media of herself on Wednesday in a strapless dress, followers were amazed at how she managed togel online to get her boobs looking so great without straps or tape.

    'Pretty please help a gal out who also has rather large upper half and would absolutely LOVE to wear a dress like this- strapless bra??????' Rinaaa13 wrote on the photo of Ms Cachia in the dress by brand The Con-nection. 'Bra details pleeeese. So hard finding a strapless that stays up for the big t**** committee,' Caz Drummond also commented. Truth time: The 25-year-old also posted a video on Snapchat of her in the bra (above) saying that the Freya strapless 'holds these big bazookas up'
    'Doubles as a joining beanie': She also posted a hilarious snap of herself and her husband wearing the bra like a hat, showing how big the cups really were

    In response Ms Cachia posted to Snapchat revealing that she wears Freya branded strapless bras, namely the Deco Nude Moulded Strapless Bra. The bra retails online for $84.95 AUD (£46.41, $63.51 USD) and goes all the way up to a K cup.'Everyone's asking me what bra I wear when I need a strapless bra. I'm going to have to look at what the brand is but [this one] holds these big bazookas up,' the mother-of-one said in a Snapchat video of her wearing the bra.

    Searching far and wide: The 25-year-old has written before on her blog, The Young Mummy, about her struggles to find bras for her big breastsPrayers answered: The bra that Ms Cachia swears by is a Freya strapless bra that retails for $84.95 each and is available in nude or black Shortly afterwards she posted a photo of the label of the bra, with the caption 'Amazing brand for big boobies'.Afterwards she posted a hilarious photo with her and her husband wearing the bra on their heads, demonstrating exactly how big the cups are.The blogger has previously written about growing up with big breasts, and how difficult she has found it at various times to buy nice bras in her size. 
    Posted by JDWEB Seo
    No comments | 18.42
    Alexandra Cooke believes the world could use a little more My Little Pony.
    "Maybe not necessarily the plastic kind, but the ideals. The ideals are good," the Palmerston, Ont. woman says.
    Cooke has more than 500 ponies in her collection, and many of them are on display at the Wellington County Museum and Archives just outside of Elora.
    My Little Pony exhibit Wellington County Museum Alexandra Cooke
    Cooke's first pony was Applejack. (Kate Bueckert/CBC News)
    Her first pony was Applejack, but Cooke – who is a graphic designer – does not have a favourite.
    "Oh, I can't choose," she said with a laugh. "I have some that I prefer over others, and I think it's more just because I find bandar togel the colours appealing."
    In honour of her collection and the museum display, there will be a hosting a My Little Pony spa day on July 20.
    My Little Pony exhibit Wellington County Museum Alexandra Cooke
    Cooke says she loves the different colours of the ponies. (Kate Bueckert/CBC News)
    Other My Little Pony owners can bring in their ponies to get tips on how to freshen up their looks. 
    Cooke will be on hand to help wash and curl hair and even teach people how to replace the painted design on the pony, which is called a cutie mark.
    Here's a sample of the ponies in her collection:
    Soft, fuzzy ponies. My Little Pony exhibit Wellington County Museum Alexandra Cooke
    (Kate Bueckert/CBC News)
    A pony wearing a ball gown. My Little Pony exhibit Wellington County Museum Alexandra Cooke
    (Kate Bueckert/CBC News)
    These are Big Brother ponies. My Little Pony exhibit Wellington County Museum Alexandra Cooke
    (Kate Bueckert/CBC News)
    There are often many versions of ponies – here are three different Blossoms. My Little Pony exhibit Wellington County Museum Alexandra Cooke
    (Kate Bueckert/CBC News)
    All the colours of the rainbow. My Little Pony exhibit Wellington County Museum Alexandra Cooke
    (Kate Bueckert/CBC News)
    This one – Gusty – must be Canadian. My Little Pony exhibit Wellington County Museum Alexandra Cooke
    (Kate Bueckert/CBC News)
    ​Tired of ponies yet? No? Good. This one is ready to go scuba diving. My Little Pony exhibit Wellington County Museum Alexandra Cooke
    (Kate Bueckert/CBC News)
    Shh! Sleepy baby pony needs a nap. My Little Pony exhibit Wellington County Museum Alexandra Cooke
    (Kate Bueckert/CBC News)
    Sassy pony with glasses. My Little Pony exhibit Wellington County Museum Alexandra Cooke
    (Kate Bueckert/CBC News)
    And, of course, ponies to play with. 
    These ones are outside the cases, and visitors agen togel are encouraged to have fun with them.
    My Little Pony exhibit Wellington County Museum Alexandra Cooke
    (Kate Bueckert/CBC News)